Shahla Talebi

About: 

A native of Iran, Shahla Talebi lived through the 1979 Revolution and the Iran-Iraq War and left Iran in 1994 to the United States where she now resides. She received her undergraduate degree in social-cultural anthropology from University of California Berkeley and her masters and PhD, also in social cultural anthropology, from Columbia University. She is currently an assistant professor of Religious Studies in the School of Historical, Philosophical and Religious Studies at Arizona State University. Her research interests include questions of self sacrifice and martyrdom, violence, memory, trauma, death, burial, funerary rituals, commemoration and memorialization or their banning, religion, revolution, and nation-state in contemporary Iran. Talebi’s manuscript entitled When God Cried: Death, Madness and Survival in Iranian Political Prisons is forthcoming by Stanford University Press. Her article “From the Light of the Eye to the Eye of the Power” is in press with the Journal of Visual Anthropology. Her other article, “Who is Behind the name,” is about to appear in The Journal of Middle East Women's Studies, and she has a couple of articles under review with other journals.

Title: 

Assistant professor of Religious Studies in the School of Historical, Philosophical and Religious Studies at Arizona State University.